Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon

This is often an encyclopedic dictionary of on the subject of four hundred very important philosophical, literary, and political phrases and ideas that defy easy--or any--translation from one language and tradition to a different. Drawn from greater than a dozen languages, phrases equivalent to Dasein (German), pravda (Russian), saudade (Portuguese), and stato (Italian) are completely tested in all their cross-linguistic and cross-cultural complexities. Spanning the classical, medieval, early sleek, smooth, and modern classes, those are phrases that impression considering around the humanities. The entries, written by way of greater than a hundred and fifty wonderful students, describe the origins and meanings of every time period, the heritage and context of its utilization, its translations into different languages, and its use in extraordinary texts. The dictionary additionally contains essays at the designated features of specific languages--English, French, German, Greek, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

Originally released in French, this distinct reference paintings is now on hand in English for the 1st time, with new contributions from Judith Butler, Daniel Heller-Roazen, Ben Kafka, Kevin McLaughlin, Kenneth Reinhard, Stella Sandford, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Jane Tylus, Anthony Vidler, Susan Wolfson, Robert J. C. younger, and lots of more.The result's a useful reference for college kids, students, and basic readers attracted to the multilingual lives of a few of our so much influential phrases and ideas.

• Covers with regards to four hundred very important philosophical, literary, and political phrases that defy effortless translation among languages and cultures

• comprises phrases from greater than a dozen languages

• Entries written via greater than one hundred fifty unique thinkers

• on hand in English for the 1st time, with new contributions by way of Judith Butler, Daniel Heller-Roazen, Ben Kafka, Kevin McLaughlin, Kenneth Reinhard, Stella Sandford, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Jane Tylus, Anthony Vidler, Susan Wolfson, Robert J. C. younger, and plenty of more

• comprises broad cross-references and bibliographies

• a useful source for college students and students around the humanities

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Extra info for Dictionary of Untranslatables: A Philosophical Lexicon (Translation/Transnation)

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Ontology: Potential and Act 1. In Latin, the distinction between potentia and actus is used to translate the Aristotelian distinction between dunamis [δύναμιϛ] and energeia [ἐνέϱγεια]. Actus translates the two terms of the Greek differentiation between ergon [ἔϱγον] and energeia [ἐνέϱγεια], which French has difficulty rendering without using two roots, œuvre for ergon (from *werg-; cf. Ger. Wirkung) and acte for energeia: for the Greek, see FORCE, Box 1, PRAXIS, Box 1, ESSENCE, TO BE, WORK. 2. On the ontological gradation between potential and act, see, in addition to the Aristotelian definition of movement (FORCE, Box 1): ESSENCE, ESTI, TO BE, PROPERTY; cf.

The universal has two modes of being: one in things, the other as conceived. This distinction corresponds to that established by Scholasticism between the universal in re and the universal post rem. 2, and for huparxis, see De anima liber cum mantissa, 90; see also SUBJECT and ESSENCE). At the dawn of the Middle Ages, Boethius, a Latin translator and commentator on Aristotle, formulated the second thesis on which abstractionism is based, explaining that “all concepts derived from things that are not conceived as they are arranged are not necessarily empty and false” (RT: PG, t.

Historia de España. Saragosse: Ebro, 1964. Translation by John Stevens: The General History of Spain. London: R. Sare, 1699. Deleito y Piñuela, José. El Sentimiento de tristeza en la literatura contemporanea. Barcelona: Minerva, 1917. D’Ors, Eugenio. Oceanografia del tedio. Barcelona: Calpe, 1920. Meltzer, Françoise. ” In Walter Benjamin and the Demands of History. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1996. Villaespesa, Francisco. Tristitiae rerum. Madrid: Imp. Arroyave, 1906. ACTOR 9 ACT “Act” comes from Latin actum, the nominalized passive past participle of agere, which means “to push ahead of oneself,” like the Greek agein [ἄγειν] (cf.

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