BGS rock classification scheme. Volume 3, classification of by Hallsworth, C R; Knox, Robert

By Hallsworth, C R; Knox, Robert

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Extra resources for BGS rock classification scheme. Volume 3, classification of sediments and sedimentary rocks

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It develops in tropical and warm-temperate climates. • Ooze — a fine-grained pelagic sediment consisting dominantly of calcareous or siliceous organic remains. g. smectite), it has a high proportion of water and little plasticity. It is formed by in-situ decomposition of igneous rocks containing a high proportion of glass. 28 material. It is formed in bogs, marshes and shallow lakes by precipitation from iron-bearing waters and by the oxidising action of algae, iron bacteria or the atmosphere. • Blackband ironstone — a dark variety of mud ironstone containing siderite clasts and sufficient carbonaceous material (10 to 20%) to make it self-calcining (Bates and Jackson, 1987).

1937. Terminology of fine-grained mechanical sediments. National Resource Council, Report Committee. Sedimentation (1936–1937) WARD, C R. 1985. Coal geology and coal technology. ) WENTWORTH, C K. 1922. A scale of grade and class terms for clastic sediments. Journal of Geology, Vol. 30, 377–392. WRIGHT, V P. 1992. A revised classification of limestones. Sedimentary Geology, Vol. 76, 177–185. YOUNG, T P. 1989. Phanerozoic ironstones: an introduction and review. ix–xxv in Phanerozoic ironstones. YOUNG T P, and TAYLOR, W E G (editors).

36. INGRAM, R L. 1954. Terminology for the thickness of stratification and parting units in sedimentary rocks. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, Vol. 65, 937–938. INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR COAL PETROLOGY — Lexicon of Coal Petrology, 1963. 1 Yes Classify under phosphatesediment and phosphorite Section 4 Yes Classify under ironsediment and ironstone Section 5 Yes Classify as non-clastic siliceous sediments* Section 8 Yes Classify as non-carbonate salts Section 7 Yes Classify under miscellaneous oxides and hydroxides + silicate sediments* Section 9 No Don't know sediment* = sediments and sedimentary rocks Are primary constituents greater than 50% non-clastic silica No Don't know Are primary constituents greater than 50% non-carbonate salts No Don't know Are primary constituents greater than 50% oxides or hydroxides Figure 1 Flowchart for the classification of sediments and sedimentary rocks.

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